What to Do on Mondays (Suggestions from Worship Leaders)

“How would you recommend a rookie worship leader spend their Mondays?”

We asked that question on Faithlife’s Facebook—and got some great responses. Here they are, combined with a few suggestions of our own.

Evaluating

How did it go yesterday? Did you lead the congregation through the rhythm of revelation and response? Did you make your volunteers feel appreciated and valued? Did you help or hinder the message? Was the service excellent?

Monday is the best time to ask these questions because you’ll be in a position to course-correct for next weekend. Create a list of evaluation questions, and take an hour to answer them each Monday. Keep a record for yourself, so in six months you can track your own development and see patterns emerge.

Nothing

Mondays are also great times to take your own Sabbath.

If Saturday is spent cobbling together last-minute details and Sunday is a whirlwind of action, Monday may be the best time for the prayerful reflection so scarce throughout the rest of the week. If you decide to make Monday a Sabbath, you’ll have to protect it from a thousand potential distractions. This will not be an easy choice—be ready.

Sending thank-you notes

That sense of accomplishment and satisfaction you feel on Monday morning after a job well done wouldn’t be possible without the selflessness of many volunteers. They’ll be at it again on Monday morning, and they won’t have much of a choice about how they spend their day. Taking a few minutes to send them notes of encouragement will show that their efforts are appreciated.

Self-improvement

It’s a little easier to see your shortcomings on Monday after they showed Sunday morning. You can either ignore them, or you can take action to grow and improve. Mondays are a great time to learn a new instrument, a new ministry skill, or a new personal discipline. Make it the day you use to keep your resolutions.

Planning

The next weekend service is only a few days away, and there are set lists to write, stages to design, and transitions to plan. Hopefully you’re not starting from scratch with only six days to go. Even if you are, spend a whole day planning out the next few months. Use Mondays to get ahead.

Here’s a tip: You can use Faithlife Music to help you build your setlist. You can see what songs are popular, get suggestions for related songs, and more.

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Written by
Ray Deck III

Born in WV, Ray escaped to North Carolina at a young age. He came to Logos after an 8 year stint at a faith-based nonprofit in New York. When he is not assembling sequences of words, he’s probably running, surfing or shooting skeet, but you should probably go look for him. He has a terrible sense of direction and is probably lost.

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Written by Ray Deck III