Here’s How to Keep Church Visitors Coming Back

Church visitors shaking hands

All too often, the job of making visitors feel welcome in your church is relegated to a couple of faithful volunteers who stand by the entry each Sunday morning, extending the right hand of fellowship with a friendly smile.

You know who I’m talking about. Aren’t you glad those brave souls take care of greeting visitors, so you don’t have to?

Actually, no, this is a team sport. While we can’t change people’s hearts or control how they respond to an encounter with Jesus, we can take very real steps to encourage whoever God sends our way.

And that means everyone in your congregation plays a role welcoming others. Every staff member, every pastor, every volunteer. Everyone in the building.
If we left anyone out of that list, it wasn’t intentional.

How to get a “friendly church” reputation

The good news is that making visitors feel welcome and included in your church is not a complicated proposition. Done right, it’s actually a lot of fun. And a healthy greeting and follow-up program builds up your congregation, from the inside out. It keeps you focused on others. It helps you develop that much-wanted reputation of “Hey, they’re a friendly church!”

Becoming that friendly church also takes a plan, and sometimes a bit of encouragement since greeting strangers doesn’t come naturally to everyone. Even if your church already has a good share of outgoing, friendly people, it’s still easy for visitors to fall through the cracks.

The question is, how do you get out of a closed pattern to take the next step? Proclaim has a free e-book to help you map out a realistic plan that works for your church—no matter how large or small you are.

Of course, what you do with the plan is up to you. But in this e-book you’re going to learn:

  • Strategies to help new people develop real relationships with members of your church. (This is for everyone.)
  • Specific ways your church service can make visitors feel more welcome. (This is for those who plan the service.)
  • Appropriate follow-up methods to bring more people back next week, using the contact information they give you. (This is for your administrative staff and volunteers.)
  • Meaningful ways your sermons can reach visitors more effectively. (This is for your pastors or lay preachers.)

Sunday’s coming, and you never know who will show up. With this plan in place, you’ll soon be telling them, “Welcome back!” Download your free e-book now.

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Written by
Robert Elmer
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Written by Robert Elmer