4 Books on Sale by N. T. Wright & Josh McDowell

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At any given moment, there are hundreds of books on sale at Logos.com, most of which can be enjoyed in your free Faithlife Study Bible app. Here are four books on sale that were too good to go unmentioned.

N. T. Wright, one of the most universally trusted theologians in the modern era. We’re proud to list him among our contributors. Two of his earliest works, which laid the foundation for much of his writing career, are discounted this month:

For All God’s Worthon sale for $10.95!
An insightful exploration of both the meaning and results of worship, this book addresses a range of church-related issues that inevitably arrive around the activity of worship, while calling for a renewal of worship arts inside today’s church.

Who Was Jesus?on sale for $13.95!
In the mid-1990s, a wave of controversial books and articles attempted to reframe the historical Jesus. Wild theories emerged, and many were caused to doubt. N. T. Wright wrote this reasoned response, comparing external sources to the Gospel accounts, he forms a clear, faith-inspiring portrait of Christ.

Josh McDowell, a prolific preacher and writer, is best known for his work in Christian apologetics and epistemology. He rose to prominence just in time to meet the challenges of postmodernism.

Evidence for Christianityon sale for $13.95!
In this book, McDowell boldly addresses many of the most pressing questions surrounding Christianity. The answers contained here are not flimsy, but battle-tested in debates with both Marxists and Islamic apologists. If you have a burning question, this book will give you a straight answer.

Josh McDowell’s Handbook on Apologeticson sale for $15.95!
This volume systematically answers important questions like, “Is Scripture reliable?” and, “Is the church necessary?” A compilation of McDowell’s popular Evidence series, this volume is a must-read for new or inquisitive believers.

All four of these books are accessible from your free Faithlife Study Bible app. Get them on Logos.com, and you can enjoy them right away.

Comments

  1. says

    N.T. Wright one of the most universally trusted theologians in the modern era? Replace "trusted" with "controversial", please. Perhaps I'm wrong, but doesn't his theology go to works-based salvation? Doesn't he deny that Christians become the righteousness of God in Christ? Doesn't he redefine righteousness as "covenant community".
    I don't mean to be rude, but this is disappointing – almost as disappointing as the vyrso headline that appeared on my logos homepage a few days ago – "How to live by the words of MLK, Jr.", or something similar.
    If Logos presents a theologian with a controversial works-based approach to earning / keeping salvation, then what's next? Any good deals on Mormon books in the pipeline?

  2. says

    Brian your understanding of Wright is caricatured and best and imprecise. Declaring that judgment is connected to works in scripture is hardly a works based salvation. He also does not redefine righteousness he exegetes the text and points out that righteousness in essence means covenant membership. Covenant membership is the very essence of being in the family of God or if you must, being saved. Wright will be the most influential theologian of our time and it will be for the good of the church and the Gospel of King Jesus.

  3. says

    Brian your understanding of Wright is caricatured and best and imprecise. Declaring that judgment is connected to works in scripture is hardly a works based salvation. He also does not redefine righteousness he exegetes the text and points out that righteousness in essence means covenant membership. Covenant membership is the very essence of being in the family of God or if you must, being saved. Wright will be the most influential theologian of our time and it will be for the good of the church and the Gospel of King Jesus.

  4. says

    Alan Hawkins – thanks for your reply, but I disagree. You may call it exegesis, but I call it eisogesis when someone bases an opinion on faulty research and then reads that opinion into the text. I have no problem saying that judgment is connected to works. I do have a problem with saying that salvation is based on works or maintained by works, and that is exactly the gospel that Wright puts forward. This is "another gospel" that floats well in a post-modern age of deception, where unity trumps truth. But truth is important. This isn't about empty philosophical arguments that end up having no effect on people; this is about our right-standing before God, based on the work and faith of Christ, not our own works. And contrary to NPP folk, the sin problem is, in fact, the problem that Paul deals with when he speaks of righteousness and justification. The Gospel that saves is the one that imputes alien righteousness on the believer! Reading Paul without consideration of Wright's rabbit-trail theology leads one naturally to the righteousness of Christ – not covenant community.

    Again thank you for your response. I'm not going to comment on it again, though. The home page of my logos application pointed to this blog, and as a paying customer who has invested "a lot" of money in this application, I feel I've paid for the right to express my opinion, especially when there is a "comment" section. But I realize this kind of back-and-forth can go on for quite a while and lead no where. I do want to encourage you and others to, at the very least, read something that opposes Wright – or better yet, put down all the lengthy persuasive arguments from men and just read scripture…

  5. says

    Matt Dabbs – so goes the usual reply when one critiques Wright … 1) you haven't read him, or 2) you don't understand him.
    To answer the claim, no, I'm not reading Piper and have not ever read his book to Wright about NPP. But I do spend a lot of time in scripture. :)

  6. says

    Brian Phillips I asked you that because I have run into people who said what you said and turns out that is what they had done. Thanks for the clarification and glad you are in the scriptures. Which of Wrights books have you tried out?

  7. Carl Lewis says

    Brian Phillips – I'm not sure where that critique comes from. I've read a majority of N.T. Wright's books, and I don't get that impression at all. Even Richard B. Hayes and Hauerwas agree, that one of the focal lenses of Christianity, is the community. Rodney Stark in his book the Rise of Christianity agrees with that notion, and Stark looked at it from a sociological and non faith-based perspective. I too am glad that you're in the Scriptures, but I would take a deeper, objective look, at Wright's work and the questions pertaining to his theology after you've had a chance to build your own theology in comparison.

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