3 Tips to Help Your Donors Love Mobile Giving

What three mobile apps do your members use most?

A recent survey shows nearly one-third of smartphone users rank their mobile banking app as their most-used app, just after social media and weather. And it’s not just the under-30 crowd that’s managing their money from their phones. Nearly half of adults in the survey are increasingly using mobile banking.1

If your church isn’t using mobile giving, there’s a good chance you’re missing out on gifts that people really want to make. But you don’t have to stay stuck!

Here are three keys to making the most of these changes when it comes to helping your members give financially.

1. Make giving mobile-friendly

Using your online giving system, your donors should be able to quickly and easily set up a new or recurring gift, choose which fund to give toward, update their payment method, and check their giving history—all from their phones.

And if you use more than one fund, name each fund something that’s easy to figure out. For example, if your church’s benevolence fund is called “Mission: Boston,” then add “benevolence” or “local missions” in parentheses. Or add a brief description of how Mission: Boston funds are used, such as: “homeless ministry, care packets, and food bank.”

When it’s easy to find where to give and it’s easy to make a gift, people respond.

Tip: Put yourself in the shoes of a new person at your church and make a test gift. How long does it take? Would a new donor feel confident that their gift is going to the right place? Would they be confused by the fund choices? Is your church name and/or logo visible? 

2. Put giving and church engagement in the same place

One of the biggest hurdles to helping your donors love online giving is making them use different tools for giving, engagement, event registration, and so on.

Bringing all your tools into one solution makes it more intuitive for your congregants’ everyday lives. For example, in Faithlife, your donors can start a discussion with their small group, RSVP for an event, and set up a new gift—all on Faithlife.com, and all on their phones.

Tip: Audit the congregation-facing tools your church uses. Do any of the tools for giving, events, or engagement overlap? If so, how can you consolidate your tools?

3. Show how giving fuels mission

The nuts and bolts of online giving are only part of the story—it doesn’t matter how easy you make giving if your congregation isn’t inspired toward generosity.

The best way to do this is to teach about giving from Scripture, using passages like 1 Timothy 6:17–19 or 2 Corinthians 9. A living theology of generosity is built gradually, once it’s rooted in the gospel.

Another way to inspire generosity is to go out of your way to share stories about how your church’s generosity is making a difference in your community. Did your church support a single mom who needed a job? Did you send a team on a mission trip? Did you hire a new staff member to train small group leaders? By sharing stories like these, your donors know they’re a part of making your vision a reality each time they pull out their phones to make a gift.

Tip: What’s one new initiative or benevolence opportunity your church was able to support last year because of your donors’ generosity? Share the story from the stage or in your church’s Faithlife group, and thank each person who gave.

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Get simple, intuitive online giving for your church with Faithlife Giving—no monthly fee required.

 

  1. https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/mobile-banking-one-of-top-three-most-used-apps-by-americans-2018-citi-mobile-banking-study-reveals-300636938.html
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Written by
Jennifer Grisham

Jennifer Grisham is a writer for Faithlife, makers of Logos Bible Software and other tools for churches. She previously served as director of administration at a church and managing editor and administrator for a ministry to worship leaders. Her work has been published by The Gospel Coalition, The Gospel Project, and Doxology & Theology, to name a few.

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Written by Jennifer Grisham